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Referring to Bible verses on a sympathy card.
Religion

w8in
Feb 17, 2007
22 votes
11 debaters
4
1
1


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10
OK


riddar
Feb 17, 2007
1 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: w8in Show

At worst, it may be a few comforting words, no different than the words of any decent author on the subject of death (assuming an appropriate and comforting message is chosen).

At best, it can make a huge difference, allowing someone who has religion to relieve their pain and think about death in a more positive sense in one go. When you are questioning the fairness of your god, sometimes a well-chosen passage can help rather than hurt.

Assuming he didn't point to completely faith based verses, which hold no significance to the non-religious, I don't see anything wrong with it. Of course, that is a very personal statement, and your views are obviously different. Bring it up to your friend at some point; a friend will want to know if you don't consider such comforting in the future.

 
vancam
Feb 17, 2007
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: w8in Show

It is after all just a book. I would enoy a quote from the bible
if it was sensible and relevant to me as much as a quote from as
any literary work.

They would have to pick a good one though because most of the
book appears to be badly misconstrude nonesense.

 
nbcrusader
Feb 19, 2007
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Good Lord! (I hope that wasn't deem 'offensive')

But that's the point. When will people stop looking to be offended. Sincerity of message is lost because someone might declare it to be "too preachy".



 
shoomesh
Feb 20, 2007
0 convinced
Rebuttal
I would also like to add, that the card itself is only a message. Should someone excersize poor discretion in the giving of that message, the company should not be faulted. They too, have pockets to line with the proceeds of the faithful.

 
boundlessgravity
Feb 23, 2007
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Confession: I am not a Christian in the typical sense.

As always, when you write something that ideally should be from your heart (which, incidentally, can certainly include quotes from notables, novels, poems, or religious texts, among many other sources), you need to balance your truthful self-expression (the way you want to say it) against a compassion and understanding of the audience (the way you need to say it for them best to hear it). In this case, you are the writer of a sympathy card.

Side Note: A sympathy card is more a gesture than anything, isn't it? Barring profanities, racism or misogyny, I'll probably take it as a sign that the person who's given it to me was at least *trying* to express some form of affirmation and compassion.

So, as the writer of a sympathy card, your audience will be the person you give it to. In order to properly augment the expression of affirmation and compassion, you should choose wording which both expresses how you truly feel and which will also be received with maximum effect by the person you give it to.

Meaning that -- if you're a sensitive, caring person, you'll know which verse is appropriate to your friend, if any. You might choose something from Ecclesiastes, considered one of the greatest existentialist works of all time ("ashes to ashes, dust to dust"), or something from Psalms ("Oh, that I had the wings of a dove! I would fly away and be at rest"), or something totally inappropriate *to anyone but your friend or loved one*, who you presumably know well enough to be able to choose a verse like: "This is how it will be at the end of the age. The angels will come and separate the wicked from the righteous, and throw them into the fiery furnace, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. --So Sorry For Your Loss--" Revelations is very imaginative, if you haven't read it.

Even if you were to be offended by the *audacity* of someone trying to comfort you with a bible verse, consider that, although many Christians believe the bible to be the inspired word of God, you, in all likelihood, do not. Understand that these quotes are just words and stories written by other men and women meant to do what a sympathy card does -- express affirmation, compassion, to give meaning to things like death and loss (and perhaps sympathy and compassion *are* the meaning we typically take from death and loss, finding solace in the interaction and interconnection we can no longer have with the departed) and, in the case of the bible, guidance for interacting with the world -- perhaps it's 3000 years outdated, but surely there's at least part of the whole thing that remains relevant?



 
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12
Not OK


thales
Feb 17, 2007
4 convinced
Rebuttal
Even with the best of intentions, it can come across as preachy or judgmental of someone's religious observances (or lack thereof). At such a sensitive time, when the whole focus should be on the recipient of the card, it is important not to come across as having an agenda--whether you actually do or not.

 
w8in
Feb 17, 2007
1 convinced
Rebuttal
I received a sympathy card when my dad passed away and I was pointed to some Bible verses by the sender.

I don't think this is very appropriate. While I do think the sender had good intentions (spreading hope and comfort), I don't think people should assume everyone wants to use the Bible as a book to live by or to find comfort in.
Especially in cases of death and accompanying circumstances, where people may start questioning the justness of God anyway, if they believe in him at all.

 

Feb 18, 2007
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: vancam Show

Talk about badly "misconstrude nonesense".....

 
tggdan3
Feb 21, 2007
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Statistically, people are more likely to die when they know that people are praying for them than if they don't know that.

It might be the placebo effect- making them feel their cause is worthless.

Plus, you wouldn't put lines from Mein Kamph or the Bhagivad Gita or the 3 Little Pigs on a card. If somone doesn't believe in God then all those books carry the same weight. When someone is sick is not the time to burden them with your religious sales speech.

 
noir
Feb 21, 2007
0 convinced
Rebuttal
When in doubt, leave it out. Always be thoughtful of your audience. Unless you're sending a card to a Christian Minister, you might want to leave the biblical references out.



 
jonjax71
Feb 23, 2007
0 convinced
Rebuttal
I don't want any theological references made on greeting cards, doesn't matter if they come from the buy bull, the koo koo ran, tore ah, where ever.

By the by and by, ever notice how some atheists use the term of astonshiment, "oh my gawd"? As George Carlin once commented atheists should exclaim "oh my non-existent supreme being"

Jon Jax 71

 


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