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Is facebook too adctive?
Society

studentmwsc6
Dec 06, 2011
4 votes
3 debaters


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2
it is


chatterbox1027
Dec 11, 2011
0 convinced
Rebuttal
It is pretty addictive. I mean you can't leave the house without someone saying "did you see what happened on Facebook?" People send invites that if you weren't on everyday, you would have no clue it happened. they get in relationships and don't tell you because they assume you saw it on there.

 
antoniothedebater
Dec 20, 2011
0 convinced
Rebuttal
It is quite addictive in the sense that majority of the youth nowadays go to Facebook instead of researching. It is also addictive to adults, who find solace in games like Cityville, FarmVille, and other games of the same calibre. It is too addictive, but it also has its benefits, like communication, income generation, and leisure. These benefits are the causes of the addiction.

 
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2
it is not


CodyKinz
Jan 24, 2012
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: antoniothedebater Show

Majority of youth may drink or do drugs instead of researching but that doesn't make Facebook addictive in itself. It mostly just a group of games and features compressed into one. Your not addicting to Facebook, your addicted to the add-ons OF Facebook.

 


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