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The Use Of The Creole Impacts Negatively On A Child's Ability To Master The English Language.
Society

romaro
Jul 11, 2010
2 votes
3 debaters


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2
Yes, It Does. Students Find It Hard To Properly Master The English Language Because The Creole Has A


pinecone
Jul 12, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Obviously, it'd make the child confused about English/foreign language grammar and the likes, thus impairing their ability of speaking English.

 
romaro
Jul 12, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
The vocabulary of a creole language consists of cognates from the parent languages, though there are often clear phonetic and semantic shifts. On the other hand, the grammar often has original features but may differ substantially from those of the parent languages. When a child is able to master a language, he or she should be able to speak the language correctly and fluently, write the language free from grammatical errors and he or she should be able to read and understand the language. Until you can prove that the Creole, does not, in anyway affect non of the three above, i will continue to say that the Creole, whether it may be Jamaican OR Trinidadian, affects the child's ability to master the English Language. The official language of Haiti is not English, why then include Haiti in this debate.

 
romaro
Jul 13, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: jonjax71 Show

Children in the Caribbean sit the CSEC examination in high school. In a CXC report (link will be provided upon your request), the teachers of the English Language subjects which include English Literature and English Reading are advised that they not use Creole within class sessions because students are writing parts of their essays in Creole. This practice is unacceptable. Do you know why students write parts of their essays in Creole? It is because they are so exposed to it, that its very difficult to make the transition, so they substitute words and sentences, this is certainly not showing any level of mastery of the English Language. The same way the students/children speak, that is the exact way they write, you really need to visit the CXC's. Classroom teachers complain in a news paper article that some of their students cant express their thoughts properly without having to go back to the Creole to seek words, so they can express their thought(s).

 
romaro
Jul 14, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
You mentioned about your wife being a Jamaican and is able to speak both the English Language and the Creole, but the obvious reason why your wife is not an appropriate example for this debate is because she is not living in her native country anymore, where it is spoken everywhere and at anytime, unlike those children who are exposed to no form of "English", perhaps only when they go to school. They are just exposed to this Creole, and the people of the country cannot help but speak the Creole because this is what they own, this is the language they know, why, because of SLAVERY. Furthermore, a language is not learn by seeing it been written only, the critical part of it is listening and picking up on the word, which then become a part of the individual's vocabulary. So when the adults use this, the children quickly learn.

 
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0
No, I Disagree. Every Student Is Capable Of Mastering The English Language Reguardless Of The Other


jonjax71
Jul 12, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
The use of the Creole???? What the eff!!! Are you referring to Kreyol-the language of Haiti? if so, it isn't a negative because the vast majority of Haitians who migrate to the US pick up on English at a much faster rate than other emigres because the nature of Kreyol lends itself to speak English easier

This Creole you mention, could it be the local speak of native New Orleanians? Do you relaize that creole is defined as native?

 
jonjax71
Jul 13, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: romaro Show

If you are the poster defending yourself then "the Use of the Creole" and your rebuttal "The vocabulary of a creole language" are two different themed debates, the former being vague and misleading and the latter being a crock. My wife is Jahmaican and she can speak pidgeon Englsh, Jahmaican creole English with such precision that non-Jamaican English speakers will barely understand anything, yet my wife speaks perfect English, my better than mine-a US born and bred person, she came to the US for college where we met

All of her famliy can speak both versions of English easily, i doesn't affect the children anymore than being raised in a bi-lingual home does. The same method not only applies to other English speaking islands of the Caribbean, the same holds true for Spanish, French and Dutch speaking islands where the islanders speak a certain way among themsleves and then the more formal European way of the language imposed on them through slavery. I know when I have to speak prper English and when i have to speak Black English. You are way off.

The reason i mentioned Haiti is that the poster-be it you or whomever was so vague it appeared that it was a reference to the Kreyol language of Haiti

 


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