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Should religious elective classes be offered in public schools?
Education

nelsont
Mar 12, 2010
5 votes
7 debaters
5
1
1


+ Add Argument

3
yes, as long as their elective, not mandatory


scarleta
Mar 14, 2010
1 convinced
Rebuttal
As long as all religions are taught without preference or bias it would not violate church-state separation because no religion would be promoted.

 
serejka
Mar 15, 2010
1 convinced
Rebuttal
Well this is a fairly obvious question.
If a student wishes to take a course on religion, they should be allowed to.
They DO NOT have to take their parents' opinions into account.
If any student can take Drama or Art without a parent's permission, why should religion be different?

 
rebirth
Mar 13, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
If we wanted to separate church from state, we should just privatize the education system all together.

But schools should offer a World Religions elective, so that way students have a fair knowledge of dozens of religions from different parts of the world - not just their religion.

 
serejka
Mar 15, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: frankiej4189 Show

So you're saying that we shouldn't have elective religious courses in public schools because that would cause problems for the administration?
Why should we have a mandatory school system anyways?
Wouldn't it be easier for the administration if all the drug addicts and bullies didn't go to school?
Your argument is flawed.

 
serejka
Mar 16, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: againstthecurrents Show

We're talking about a school course on religion, not a meeting to pray and worship.
Such a course would be purely academic - just like students in schools today study history, so they would study this religion, familiarise themselves with its origins, its history, its doctrine/beliefs etc.
Our schools are made to educate our youth. Most teenagers are horribly uneducated when it comes to religion.
Teaching about religions promotes tolerance, while ignorance about religion causes prejudice and hate.
I think that stopping hatred and promoting tolerance is quite a worthy use of tax dollars, and I'm surprised that you don't agree.

 
serejka
Mar 17, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: againstthecurrents Show

Your main argument seems to be that the students are not ready for the course and the materials it offers. This kind of thought impedes progress in our school systems, and I'll show you why.

Many schools, for example, allow their students to take calculus, or AP English or AP Social Studies - these are all courses offered in University. The schools' aim is to facilitate the transition from high school to university, so I don't think it should be a problem to offer courses on Religion as an AP program, as it is offered in University and it is voluntary on the parts of students to take it.

There is no harm from such a course, and the advanced thinking it promotes is healthy and beneficial, if anything.


 
kbk
Mar 23, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
I do think that having religious courses is an okay idea, so long as it is an option course and not one run by someone encouraging judaisim or chirstianity. It should be a class that ahs the typical beliefs and history of the religions but not neccesairily a class that encourages and forces the religion upon the students.
It can be a quite interesting and beneficial course due to the fact that religion is worldwide and we can all connect to one another using religion someone-- whether we're athesist, or christian or muslim, we still find a bond with someone from it.

 
+ Add Argument

2
no, it would violate church vs. state


againstthecurrents
Mar 13, 2010
3 convinced
Rebuttal
Absolute no on this one.

Imagine an evangelical mother's reaction who lives in a conservative area
that her 15 year old daughter is taking a class in Public High School on
the Quran.....

Flipped the argument a bit eh?

Well for many they would feel the same reaction to the introduction of a New Testament
class using their tax dollars.

If all is fair, and all is level, shouldn't tax money be allowed to pay for abortions as well?

Too many qualifications here, the answer is no.

 
againstthecurrents
Mar 16, 2010
2 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: serejka Show

"If a student wishes to take a course on religion, they should be allowed to."

absolutely, at a private school or college seminar, or at their local place of worship,
just not with tax dollars.



 
frankiej4189
Mar 15, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: scarleta Show

Nearly impossible, certainly not worth the many migrains it would cause.

 
frankiej4189
Mar 16, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: serejka Show

Bullies and druggies are already a part of the school system. Bringing in i.e. something that wasn't originally there, religious courses causes more problems than were originally there.

 
againstthecurrents
Mar 17, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: serejka Show

Ya, I disagree. For me, religious education is not for public schools, and a historical class on religion is for college level students. I have taken such classes and really enjoy them so it isn't because I am inherently against them. Personally I think kids learn enough "for their level" in World history or Western Civilization "depending on what your school offers". I took some really great classes in college such as "the sociology of gender" and "the history of American utopianism" but I dont think they are High School material.
I'd prefer kids take that free elective time we all keep talking about and learn how to write properly, balance a check book, or have a gym class.

 
againstthecurrents
Mar 18, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: serejka Show

I fully grasp was advanced placement is.
Again, there are many great college level classes for kids to take once they get there.
Religion, secularized or not, isn't High School material above and beyond
what the kids already learn about World Religions in global studies, social studies, and western civ.
it is -over kill- because the material is already taught.
AP classes are classes that transfer as general studies in college such as sociology, physics, u.s. histories 1/2, Religion generally isn't even a course for general study at the univ. level, but an elective for one who has completed their first 2 year foundation -if- it correlates with their major.
Kids already learn about early religions, they already learn about the rise of christianity, they already learn about it's influence in Empires and early America,
secularized historical religious info is already taught, why not teach something different that will 100% transfer "sociology/psychology are solid humanities".

 
aveskde
Apr 11, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Schools which teach religious views as fact merely assist in the process of creating a social divide because the religions themselves exclude the possibility of the others being correct, or deserving equal status.

Even if the classes were voluntary, it would mean using taxpayers' dollars to fund a contribution to an unstable society with views that no one agrees with (because a bunch of mutually exclusive religions are taught, it means that everyone winds up funding a religion that they disagree with, or more than one).

Schools should present fact, not propaganda, or ideology painted as fact.

 


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