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Should Information Technology have equal footing within a national curriculum alongside traditional core subjects i.e. English, Maths etc?
Education


Computers enter learning 'core'
Should Information Technology have equal footing within a national curriculum alongside traditional core subjects i.e. English, Maths etc?

Computer technology is to move centre stage alongside English, maths and personal skills in an overhau...
vancam
May 01, 2009
7 votes
10 debaters
1
1


+ Add Argument

4
Yes


theaccusative
May 02, 2009
1 convinced
Rebuttal
The traditional core curriculum has garnered a little bit too much privilege for my taste. In any case, it's a given that the skills to succeed in today's world are hardly dependent upon those core subjects.

For example, you could make astronomy, communication, citizenship, and programming the core curriculum in today's schools, and the effect would be comparative.

Astronomy would nurture a sense of awe and wonder in young students that is so typically lacking these days, not to mention prep them towards higher topics and big questions like "what is it all for" and "who are we"

Comunication would be probably the biggest boos to aiding young students in solving disagreements and fights with their peers, as well as teach them to communicate clearly with their leaders and teammates with little confusion.

Citizenship would help foster a sense of leaving the world a better place than when you found it, as well as teach young students that they do, in fact, have a role in how things are run around here. And I'm not talking presidential elections. A young student could help participate in a campaign for a local school board candidate.

Finally, programming would give young students the ability to take full advantage of resources and be creative with what they have. Too often, we wait for some company to make a windows suite that will do what we want, and yet are often dissapointed If it comes out. In a technology-based world, programming skills would give students the ability to make their own tools for solving problems that interest THEM, instead of just surfing the web and using interfaces designed by someone else.

I say the core curreculum of math, english, history, ect, doesn't deserve the privileges we so often put on it. Teach the kids programming. _

 
beccaleelee
Aug 19, 2009
1 convinced
Rebuttal
If students are educated about information technology in school at some time before college (and perhaps even high school), then they will be better adept at doing research for these core subjects. In addition, these students would be more able to communicate with others easily.

With the majority of high-schoolers and college students doing research via internet (rather then books) it is necessary that they have the skills required to succeed.

If we look at the core classes as being important because they give students an edge in this competitive era, we must include classes on Information Technology in the same category. If students can not understand how to utilize the available sources to the best of their means, they will be unable to remain on equal footing with students who have learned that information.

It is a school's responsibility to prepare its students to help them succeed in the future. Schools' are expected to do this to the best of their ability. Shouldn't a class that would enable students to succeed in life as well as other core classes be held in high esteem by schools? My answer: Yes.

 
vancam
May 01, 2009
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: frankiej4189 Show

You have inadvertently raised a perhaps far more interesting topic for debate;

Should students be learning ICT skills using only Microsoft products?

 
jsmiggins
Apr 29, 2011
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Yes, students should learn at least the basics of how to use a computer to manage data. In our world today we're dealing with an increasing amount of data and there's two skills that are sorely lacking even among professionals and those are how to process data at all and how to use a computer to process data. The first area is covered by statistics and the second is covered by using a program such as Excel. Some basic programming in R would be nice too.

Clearly students shouldn't have to sit through boring lectures on how to use things like Microsoft Word since they can just pick this stuff up when they need it and it would be a waste of time. But they should have a basic idea of how to use a computer to manage data and have an idea of how programming works.

 
+ Add Argument

3
No


brivapor
May 01, 2009
0 convinced
Rebuttal
all the students should be using computers and internet from the start, and as they are educated in math and other stuff they learn by using. The teacher incorperating the internet as a learning tool(im guessing they all ready do this)
the actual nitty gritty stuff of IT is for specialized learning

the computers should be a necessity like books and chalk boards are a necessity I guess im trying to say

 
frankiej4189
May 01, 2009
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Basic typing and Microsoft Office skills are a necesity. But anything further than that is either used as a luxury or part of an advanced field. So no.

 
blackkodiak
May 01, 2009
0 convinced
Rebuttal
I'm inclined to agree with brivapor on this one.

User interfaces are (or should be) specifically designed so that users don't need a separate education to interact with software.

Programming, hardware and systems meanwhile, are a little niche for my taste to be taught alongside core subjects. Programming fundamentals might be useful to teach logic, but once you leave those fundamentals, you're talking about a very important, but not universal, skill-set.

I'd have as hard of a time suggesting that nuclear physics be taught alongside core subjects.

 
ccme09
May 02, 2009
0 convinced
Rebuttal
The only programs which a person has a general need to know are the Microsoft Office programs, and everyone learns to use them at home anyway.

I'm currently doing a compulsory GCSE in ICT, and we have to take up two hours a week of school learning to use graphic and flash programs which the vast majority of us are never going to use again.

The knowledge learnt in traditional subjects is used during everyday life in the future. I think that the hours I've wasted at school (not to mention the extra hours I spend in order to meet dealines for ICT at home) could be put to better use on the worthwhile subjects in the curriculum.

 
ccme09
May 03, 2009
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: theaccusative Show

Citizenship is definately NOT a worthwhile lesson. In my school we have an hour a week dedicated to something called "Public Services": comprising of Citizenship, Fitness and Teamwork. We are set hours of assigments for each of these categories with virtually no teacher support. The teachers taking the lessons don't even know what they're doing and certainly haven't been trained in anything to do with this subject - the school has just taken on this subject for an extra grant and taken their existing teachers out of their usual schedule and lessons to teach this.

The Citizenship topic which we have to work on is basically a series of assignments where we have to look on the governments webpage and make a powerpoint displaying the info. A complete waste of time if you ask me, because if it weren't for my parents talking about these matters with me I'd have learnt nothing from these lessons.

 
unlabled00
May 03, 2009
0 convinced
Rebuttal
Rebuttal to: vancam Show

Not when you have products like OpenOffice and GoogleDocs around that can fill the role just as easily.

Hell I think Macs are a good option to start with (my elementary school used old "Macintosh Apple II's"

 
richardstaniforth
Aug 28, 2010
0 convinced
Rebuttal
No. While using the internet and other computer based tools can be very useful, Maths and English are much more important to every day life.

 


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